Impressions on the Social Age

I’ll Be Creative In A Minute

Posted in Social Networking Discovery by Trace on May 24, 2010

“I jumped, the sound hit ting me like a ton of bricks, drop ping my hot cof fee on the cat’s tail who ceased curl ing on the floor by my desk. I stood up from my office chair think ing I was lucky to be work ing from home, and went to investigate…”

OneWord.com is a recent discovery. My co-worker was using the StumbleUpon tool and literally stumbled upon this website. The site presents the user with a simple creative task. When you click the “Go” button, you’ll see one word at the top of the follow ing screen. A timer starts and you have only sixty seconds to write about it. The idea is not to think about what you’re writing, but to just flow onto the page (er… screen?).

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Facebook & Twitter Activism

Posted in Reading Response by Trace on May 19, 2010

Activism is an interesting monster. I once dated a girl who joined protest lines because she thought herself an activist. She believed in the protester’s message, but was also looking to join in! Does joining up as you’re walking make you an activist or something else?

Today we read about the activism using Facebook, Twitter and messaging for a specific group on USENET. From the readings (Facebook here and Twitter here) we discovered that activism using social networks is complex, but can e successful if done properly. The lessons focus on activism using social networking, specifically those launched via a social network.

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The Photo, Made Creepy

Posted in Social Networking Discovery by Trace on May 17, 2010

By now many of us have heard of DailyBooth, but for those that haven’t… DailyBooth is a social networking/media site that allows users to upload a photo (similar to a visual status message).

With this in mind, were a Clark Kent impersonator to step into DailyBooth he would emerge not as superman, but as Robo.to a strange/creepy version of DailyBooth. Robo.to’s website self-describes it as gathering “the latest about you into a tiny, easy to update, video-enabled calling card.” These calling cards can then be embedded and used in place of some photos you see around the blogosphere.

Verdict? Creepy? Cool? Or a bit of both? To view my Robo.to go to: http://robo.to/td501

Here Comes Shirky & Friends

Posted in Reading Response by Trace on May 17, 2010

My friend Becca recently moved to Australia to study. Before she left I asked a question that may have been ludicrous ten years ago, but no longer, “What is your blog?” What young-person moves to a new place without keeping a blog of their adventures? Becca updates her blog occasionally with short stories and insight about her experiences down under, but there was a catch. Becca asked me never to share her blog address, even with other co-workers. Becca was limiting her audience to only those she was interested in reaching – i.e. she filtered. Using one of Shirky’s points, Becca is doing exactly what he said, writing for her friends, but posting in public view.

The fascinating thing is, Becca doesn’t think of her blog as a public space. The question is, why? She grew up during not just the Internet age, but the Google age, where everything is searchable, and even posted her blog on Google’s Blogger platform, instantly searchable via Google. Perhaps there is a deeper meaning here. Becca is using the same principle a spy in the movies would use… Speak freely in crowds. Perhaps Becca feels private, because there is so much else going around the Internet, who cares about one girl studying in Australia? She’s lost in the murmur of the collective. Then again, perhaps she just doesn’t care.

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No One Likes a Qwitter

Posted in Social Networking Discovery by Trace on May 15, 2010

While using the ‘ol Twitter this week, I realized I’ve lost a follower. Now, I know it’s no big deal to lose a follower… but when you only have 190, a single follower is 0.5% of my overall user base!

During my Internet Advocacy class this semester, Rosenblatt has promised we will learn how to gain in followers, but in order to understand how you gain (easy looking at the Stats of # of clicks – I use Hootsuite) it’s not as obvious when people leave. For that, my social discovery of the week is Qwitter, an unfollow tracker for those who tie their self worth to their number of followers.

Qwitter is a free tool which sends you an email digest regarding your weekly unfollows you. It even gives you the exact tweet which might have possibly caused your fan-loss.

Simple and easy, my favorite kind of geekyness. I’ll check it out, maybe you should too, but don’t worry, it’s not what you know its who you follow… or maybe it’s who follows you? We need to update these old sayings.